Shhh! It’s not a secret: 9 Reasons Why Teachers Hate Field-Trips

It’s a fact that kids, parents, educators and researchers all agree that field trips are really stupendous. They are actually an integral part of students’ learning process and have a long history in the U.S. public education. For decades, students have piled into yellow buses to visit a variety of cultural institutions, including art, natural history, and science museums, as well as theaters, zoos, and historical sites. Schools gladly endured the expense and disruption of providing field trips because they saw these experiences as central to their educational mission.

For the teachers, however, there’s something about being fully responsible for the field trip that makes them feel like having a t-shirt that reads, “I survived this *insert name here* field trip!” when it’s all over.

 

#1 Reason: The paperwork. Oh, the paperwork

“Hey Johnny, did your mom sign the permission slip?”

“Mr. Principal, did you see the field trip approval form I emailed you last week?”

“Dear Museum, can you please confirm you received my field trip request?”

“Mr. Accountant, what else do I need to fill out to get the purchase order?”

#2 Reason: Money, where art thou?

Monday: “Hi Emily, did you bring $15 for the museum trip?”

Tuesday: “Hi Johnny, did you bring $15 for the museum trip?”

Wednesday: “Hi Albert’s dad, I need $15 check for his field trip by Friday.”

Thursday: “I love counting cash and checks! Homework grading, lessons plans, and dozens of unread emails can wait!”

Friday: “Hi Mr. Principal, I could only collect from 10 kids out of 25, do we cancel or can the school subsidize it again? Sorry, I couldn’t apply for any field-trip grants.”

 

#3 Reason: Lunches

“Hi Bobby, did you forget to bring your lunch to the trip? It’s OK, let’s share my salad and banana. Please don’t be embarrassed. I’ll try not be hungry either.”

 

#4 Reason: What nametags?

“Dear Children! I know you hate wearing nametags that I enjoyed preparing for you, but they are very important for your safety!”

“Hey Emily, why did I find your nametag on the bathroom stall?”

“Johnny! Please take the nametag from your forehead and stick it on your shirt.”

“I simply love gathering these nametags from the walls, bus seats, and desks!”

 

#5 Reason: Riding THE bus

“What’s not to love about slinging, bouncing, smelly and hot ride to and from your destination?”

“Dear Mr. Driver, nobody is chasing us and there are actually living things in your vehicle”

“Dear Andrew, we reviewed the bus rules five times before boarding the bus, so can you please get back on your seat?”

 

#6 Reason: Chaperones

“Dear Mr. Roberts, I understand you have work to do on your smart-phone, but can you please postpone it and pay attention to 5 kids you are assigned to watch?”

“Dear Mrs. Rogers, I understand you find this as an appropriate time to discuss your son’s progress in my class, but can I please enjoy my lunch?”

 

#7 Reason: Drama!

“Oh Jessica, of course you don’t look like that monument, you are very beautiful, please stop crying.”

“Dear Suzy and Jake, why does today have to be the day you can’t stand the sight of each other?”

 

#8 Reason: Bad destinations

“Dear kids! I’m very sorry that those beautiful pictures and descriptions we all saw on brochures and the website are a huge let-down upon our arrival.”

“Wow! That mesmerizing pond that we wanted to explore is really just a mosquito-infested mud-hole!”

 

#9 Reason: Yay! Returning to School.

“Hey kids, I know we are all tired and sleepy, but now that we are back an hour early before the school is dismissed, let’s get our journals and write three things that we all learned today!”

 

Now you know the top reasons why teachers hate these exhausting and crazy field-trips. Skookii can help you collect field-trip fees faster and with less drama. But we would love to tell you that teachers will continue to plan and organize them. Because to them, it’s all worth it, and that’s why our Teachers are our Heroes!

  • May 25, 2017

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